Dangerous Lettuce

Throw out all your romaine lettuce. Those people who hate salads have been on to something. To be safe, you should probably just throw out all your lettuce if you don’t know what kind it is, according to the CDC. To date there have been 53 cases of E. coli infections across 16 states linked to romaine lettuce. Thirty one people have been hospitalized “including five people who have developed a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.” The CDC has narrowed the location of the bad lettuce but warns that “unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region,” it’s not safe to eat.

Symptoms of E. coli may include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting and usually appear 1-10 days after exposure. People with weakened immune symptoms, young children, older adults, and pregnant women are most at risk for serious complications.

New Year, Same Food Dangers

Hold the salad, please. Or at least hold the romaine lettuce – a deadly outbreak of E. coli linked to this green leaf has been reported in the U.S. and Canada. At least 60 people have been infected and one person has died as a result of this outbreak.

I happen to be on a romaine lettuce kick myself, but suppose I’ll switch to another variety that hasn’t yet been contaminated. According to Food Safety News:

The risk is ongoing in both countries, officials report. Canadian officials are suggesting consumers in some provinces avoid all romaine lettuce. Government officials haven’t revealed any information about implicated suppliers, distributors or retailers in the romaine supply chain.

So that’s reassuring. It’s worth noting that while the Canadian government is advising against eating romaine lettuce, the U.S. CDC is still conducting their own research:

“Because we have not identified a source of the infections, CDC is unable to recommend whether U.S. residents should avoid a particular food. This investigation is ongoing, and more information will be released as it becomes available.”

Symptoms of E. coli may include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting and usually appear 1-10 days after exposure. People with weakened immune symptoms, young children, older adults, and pregnant women are most at risk for serious complications.