Uganda Avoids Marburg Virus Disaster

Uganda has successfully contained an outbreak of Marburg virus, just weeks after it was first detected. Within 24 hours of being notified of the first confirmed death, the WHO deployed a rapid response team to the area:

Marburg is a highly fatal disease caused by a virus from the same family as that of Ebola. It can be transmitted from person to person by bodily fluids, and can cause bleeding, fever, vomiting, diarrhea and other symptoms.

This was the fifth outbreak of Marburg virus in a decade, and lessons have been learned from those outbreaks, as well as from the West African Ebola epidemic that killed more than 11,000 people.

Surveillance and contact tracing are critical in containing the virus:

“The response to the Marburg virus disease outbreak demonstrates how early alert and response, community engagement, strong surveillance and coordinated efforts can stop an outbreak in its tracks before it ravages communities,” said Dr Peter Salama, executive director of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme.

A Way to Predict Ebola Outbreaks?

Researchers have identified a possible link between deforestation and the emergence of Ebola outbreaks. There is evidence that Ebola outbreaks are likely to occur within 2 years of forest loss.

This new research also suggests that preventing the loss of forests could reduce the likelihood of future outbreaks. “We have accumulated knowledge that removing forests causes problems not just to the functioning of the climate and ecosystems but also to humans, then we must see it as a threat to human livelihoods, health, security and everything else,” said Fa – a Senior Associate at CIFOR and a Professor of Human Development and Biodiversity at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom.

When forests are destroyed, the animals that live in them are displaced. The Ebola virus is transmitted from wild animals, such as fruit bats or apes.

The forests should not be protected for the sake conservation alone but also for health reasons, according to Lutwama, a Virologist at the Uganda Virus Institute. “People should keep the forests,” he said.

 

 

Ebola’s Revenge

Ebola is a lingerer. It’s that guest at your party that stays even when everyone else is leaving, continuing to drink from leftover open bottles of wine. It’s that annoying friend who has overstayed their welcome even though you have made it perfectly clear you have very important, but very vague things to do and while you can’t quite bring yourself to physically usher them out, you are about to set off the fire alarm in a desperate attempt to “politely” get them to leave.

Ebola may linger in semen for 2 years, or more! No one really knows yet, because while Ebola has been happening since at least 1976 (WHO fact sheet), no one was invested in funding studies to better understand Ebola until 2014, when it seemed like the United States could possibly have a Hot Zone situation on their hands. Side note: The Hot Zone is one of my favorite books and I highly recommend it. I can also recommend the audio version of the book, especially if you are on a long trip driving more than 4 hours at a time. It will definitely keep you awake.

Other lasting Ebola effects occur in the eyes. Survivors in West Africa, many of them young children, have developed cataracts. The NY Times reports:

Cataracts usually afflict the old, not the young, but doctors have been shocked to find them in Ebola survivors as young as 5. And for reasons that no one understands, some of those children have the toughest, thickest cataracts that eye surgeons have encountered, along with scarring deep inside the eye…

There are about 17,000 Ebola survivors in West Africa, and researchers estimate that 20 percent of them have had a type of severe inflammation inside the eye, uveitis. It can cause blindness, but even if it resolves and sight returns, cataracts can quickly follow. Usually, just one eye is affected.

Many Ebola survivors have been found to have “major mobility, cognitive and visual limitations” as well as “higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue and pain. They also showed difficulties in concentrating and remembering and most of them suffered from blurred vision.”

Finally, what about the people tasked with gathering the bodies?

Not only did they stand a high chance of catching the virus themselves, they also risked beatings from mobs of hostile locals, who either refused to believe the virus existed, or blamed the health workers for spreading it…

But the masks, gloves and rubber boots were no protection against a contagion of a different sort.

For many of his colleagues, the horrors they saw every day have stayed in their minds ever since, driving some towards madness and others to drink and depression.

There is some good news, though. An experimental Ebola vaccine has been found to protect against Ebola for one year.  When the next outbreak happens the world will at least be better prepared.

Please Don’t Dress Like “Sexy Ebola” For Halloween

There are plenty of offensive costumes to go around during Halloween. Today’s offender is: Sexy Ebola. Ebola is a gruesome, terrible disease that wreaked havoc on West Africa and had lasting impacts that are still being dealt with:

“We have demonstrated that a year following acute disease, survivors of the West African EVD outbreak continue to have a higher chance of disability in mobility, cognition and vision than their close contacts. Issues such as anxiety and depression persist in EVD survivors and must not be neglected,” said lead researcher Dr Soushieta Jagadesh.

By all means, dress as Ebola for Halloween. Or dress as a containment team member. Just don’t belittle the disease and call a short dress paired with a face mask “sexy Ebola.” The price tag is also pretty offensive. Sixty bucks and this thing doesn’t even come with the boots?!

sexy-ebola-costume-7_large

 

Please Don’t Dress Like “Sexy Ebola” For Halloween

There are plenty of offensive costumes to go around during Halloween. Today’s offender is: Sexy Ebola.  Ebola is a gruesome, terrible disease that wreaked havoc on West Africa and had lasting impacts that are still being dealt with. By all means, dress as Ebola for Halloween. Or dress as a containment team member. Just don’t belittle the disease and call a short dress paired stupidly with a face mask “sexy Ebola.” The price tag is also pretty offensive. Sixty bucks and this thing doesn’t even come with the boots?!

sexy-ebola-costume-7_large